Meet Artist-in-Residence
Teresa Audet

 

Where did you grow up?
I was born in Delft, Holland. My family lived in New Jersey and then Arizona when I was a child, with my extended family base in Upstate New York. We finally settled in Minnesota when I was ten years old, and Minneapolis is the closest thing to home I have ever felt.

 

How did you find out about Anderson Ranch Arts Center?
I first came to ARAC in 2011 on full scholarship from the Furniture Society taking a box-making class with Cory Robinson. I then spent most of 2013 working as an intern at the Ranch in wood, sculpture and ceramics.

 

What are you working on during your residency?
During my time at the Ranch I am focusing on refining my craft and techniques in several areas. For the past few years I have been working with a Japanese papermaking bark fiber called Kozo, and during these 10 weeks I have been scientifically refining my process in working with this fiber. I am also refining my newly developed skills in Japanese woodworking that I achieved from a recent study at the Mount Fuji School of Fine Woodworking. My current body of work deals with our interaction with objects, both utilitarian and conceptual. I am interested in the relationship of object making as a meditative practice for emotional processing.

 

Has your residency at Anderson Ranch affected your practice at all? How so?
The time and peace awarded to residents here is astronomical to my practice. I have been able to focus on ideas and concepts that have been in the back of my head for years. Without the stresses of everyday life as an artist and entrepreneur, my creativity has been able to flow. The community of resident artists and staff here has positively affected my work and my ideation.

 

How do you describe your artistic practice?
I am a craftswoman and maker of functional objects. My work focuses on function, utility, and craft, challenging expectations of usefulness and the role of physical items.

In my current works I am exploring the role of object making as a healing, meditative tool for emotional processing. Meticulous and repetitive process of woodcarving, bark weaving and wrapping is therapeutic and healing.

Tools and techniques I employ favor thoughtfulness over haste, focusing on the materials and striving for a meditative way of working. This practice of mindfulness comes from studying in Japan the art forms of the Tea Ceremony, flower arranging, and traditional woodworking. I believe in the Zen of making, the celebration of everyday objects, and the beauty of utility as celebrated in the Japanese traditional crafts.

 

What role does art play in your life?
For me, art is a tool for communication. It is a way to realize my thoughts and ideas into a physical form. I use art to communicate with my audience as well as myself, as a platform for everything from humor and beauty to social change.

 

When do you make art in your studio?
I am in my studio constantly. Working full-time as an artist and craftswoman has me in my studio every day.

 

How do you spend your time when not working in the studio?
The rare moments outside of the studio are spent reading, walking, learning new languages, baking cookies, and creating Wikipedia pages for underrepresented female artists.

 

What intrigues you in the art world today?
I think there is a fascinating intersection happening today with artists and society where individual artists are becoming activists, change makers and leaders. I am seeing an incredible amount of young people, especially young women, women of color, and members of the LGBT community taking charge and making their voices heard. The DIY attitude towards the longstanding institutions within the art world is making waves and carving new avenues for artistic practice.

 

What is your favorite part about Anderson Ranch?
The sense of community within the resident artists and staff as well as within the Roaring Fork Valley community. The magnitude of creativity flowing everywhere, from the artists at work to the food in the café and the buildings themselves.

 

How can we find you on social media and the web?
www.TeresaAudet.com

@TeresaAudet on all platforms

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