Ceramics

Code: C1219-22

    • IV

      Level IV

      Students have advanced skills and knowledge of the ceramics field. Students are highly motivated, have a minimum of five years experience in the field and have a portfolio of their artwork. Typical students are academics and professional artists.

Master Class
Handbuilt Pots: Surface and Form

Aug 22 - Sep 2, 2022

9AM-5PM

Concept

With two renowned artists at the helm, this two-week intensive workshop implements the use of simple techniques to explore freedom of ideas and process in a most exciting manner. Students elevate the quality and content of their ceramic work through the distinct lens of each of the instructors. John Gill shares his articulated approach to building and glazing by guiding the creation of vessels from soft clay slabs through darting and paper patterns. Andrea Gill imparts her expertise on surface patterning and layering of glazes. Learn the application process of transferring two-dimensional imagery onto three-dimensional surfaces, and leave with a variety of works and a comprehensive understanding of the craft.

To attend a Master Class workshop, a portfolio review is due by Friday, February 11th, 2022. Instructions on how to submit your portfolio are as follows:

  • Submit digital images of your work in one single PDF (as opposed to individual JPG attachments) via email directly to Anderson Ranch Studio Coordinator, Louise Deroualle at
    lderoualle@andersonranch.org.
  • The single PDF must be less than 10 MB to be considered.
  • Include 5-10 images of your work with image identification that lists the title, media, dimensions and year of each image.
  • While not required, it is helpful to see an artist statement addressing the images you send.
  • Include “Advanced Portfolio Review” in the subject line of your email, as well as the title of the workshop for which you are applying.
  • Please provide a phone number where you can be reached and a link to your website.

Submissions that do not follow the requested directions will not be reviewed. To be considered, we must receive portfolios by 5 PM MST Friday, Feb. 11th, 2022. If we receive your materials after Feb. 11th, you will be considered on a space-available basis.

We will email you regarding your status on or before Friday, Feb. 25, 2022. If you are accepted, a deposit of $500 will be required within one week of notification of acceptance to hold your place. Housing will be assigned on a space-available basis upon enrollment.

Media

Stoneware, porcelain, slab and hand-building, oxidation, reduction firings

Faculty

John Gill

John Gill teaches at the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. He has received numerous awards including honors from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Foundation for the Arts.

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Andrea Gill

Andrea Gill is a Professor Emerita at Alfred University. Her works are in the permanent collections of the LACMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.Andrea Gill is a professor Emerita at Alfred University. Her works are in the permanent collection of the LACMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

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John Gill, Vase

Tuition: $1,600.00
Studio Fee: $225.00
Registration Fee: $45.00

Portfolio Review Required

Join Waitlist for Master Class
Handbuilt Pots: Surface and Form

Ceramics

In 1966, American raku ceramicist Paul Soldner selected the site for what is now Anderson Ranch Arts Center, forming the foundation for a thriving ceramics program. Then and now, Anderson Ranch is a place where students exchange ideas and examine ceramic art and pottery-making techniques. It has always been a place where seminal moments of growth happen in an artist’s creative and critical thinking. Here, both beginning and emerging artists gain strong fundamental support, while established artists achieve new perspectives and advance their techniques.

The Ranch Ceramics team provides support, feedback and technical problem solving, giving each artist the freedom to experiment and grow. Our primary focus is on personal advancement through a process of creative discovery. We also offer community engagement through events like our Locals’ Clubs “Circle of Fire” where artists engage with the Ranch outside of the workshop setting.

The Soldner Ceramics Center makes up more than 10,000 square feet in three buildings. The Lyeth/Lyon kiln building is equipped with gas, electric, soda and wood kilns for both oxidation and reduction firings at all temperature ranges. The Ranch offers three wood kilns, four gas reduction kilns, one soda kiln and eleven high-temperature electric kilns.

Anderson Ranch is happy to extend a 20% Summer Workshop tuition discount for NCECA members. Please register online and then email reg@andersonranch.org with your membership information and we will make the adjustment once you are in the system. You are also welcome to call 970-924-5089 to register.

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Workshop Details

Supply List

Many of the items you'll need are available in the ArtWorks Store. Please click "View Full Supply List" to see a comprehensive list of items you'll need for this workshop.

Ceramic Glazing Brushes & Tools

Buy

Ceramic Tool Kit

Buy

Notebook

Buy

Painter’s tape

Buy

Writing Utensil

Buy

Lodging & Meals

Anderson Ranch closely follows guidance released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the State of Colorado and the Pitkin County Health Department. In order to operate safely during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Anderson Ranch has made significant modifications to our housing and meal offerings.

Summer 2022 workshop participants ages 13 and up will be required to show proof of Covid-19 vaccination. Studio program participants are required to show proof that they have received the complete Covid-19 vaccine (i.e., two weeks have passed after receiving the second dose of either the Moderna or Pfizer MRNA vaccines or the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine). Additionally, if six months have passed since completing the Moderna or Pfizer series or two months have passed since receiving the J & J vaccine, then a booster is also required. Ideally the booster would have been administered at least two weeks prior to coming to Anderson Ranch.

We have established a Business Safety Plan with added layers of precaution that prioritizes the health and safety of our staff, students, faculty and guests while continuing to provide you with the Anderson Ranch experience that you know and enjoy.

Housing is limited and includes shared and private lodging options. Reservations will be managed on a first-come, first-served basis. The earlier you reserve housing, the better your chance of receiving your preferred option. Please note: Workshop costs do not include accommodations.

Related Events

COVID-19 Safety Plan

Anderson Ranch is closely following local and national health and safety guidance. At this time, Anderson Ranch visitors and public program and event participants are not required to show proof of vaccination. Studio and artistic program participants ages 13 and up will be required to show proof of Covid-19 vaccination.
Studio and artistic program participants are required to show proof that they have received the complete Covid-19 vaccine (i.e., two weeks have passed after receiving the second dose of either the Moderna or Pfizer MRNA vaccines or the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine). Additionally, if six months have passed since completing the Moderna or Pfizer series or two months have passed since receiving the J & J vaccine, then a booster is also required. Ideally the booster would have been administered at least two weeks prior to coming to Anderson Ranch. Click here for additional health and safety information.

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  • III

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